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't happen in washingtoners it would make great television. right-to-work laws in michigan became the 24th state in the nation. it allows union workers to opt out of paying union dues even if they're not in the union. stephen moore, "wall street journal." who would be next? >> there are a number of states neighbors to michigan really looking at this legislation. i'll name a few to you, bill. pennsylvania, ohio, west virgina, states like that are competing against southern states. remember a lot of jobs and a lot of manufacturing has moved from the midwest, the kind of rust belt of america to the south in part because those southern states are right-to-work. can i mention one other thing if i could, bill, about this issue that is important? bill: sure. >> there is so much misinformation what it means to be a right-to-work state. i want your viewers to know this, if you're a right-to-work state it does not ban unions, bill. simply means that workers who work for a unionized company have the right as an individual to join the union or not. it does not ban unions. bill: to be more specific, if
washington. it's thursday, december 13, 2012. this is "the daily rundown," i'm chuck todd. the only reason we can't saturday fiscal cliff negotiations have fallen apart is that the two sides are still talking. but things are bad, make no mistake. and neither side is optimistic that anything can get done at all. with congress and the president careening to the edge of the cliff, the public is ignoring party lines and demanding an end to this mess. 70% of democrats, 59% of republicans want their own party's leaders to come to an agreement, even if it means not sticking to long-held positions on taxes and entitlements and yet despite those demand, the country is evenly divided on whether they think a consensus can be worked out here in washington, whether they believe obama and boehner can strike a deal. interestingly folks that are paying more attention to the fiscal cliff story are more pessimistic. it's the folks paying less attention that are more optimistic. judging by what we're hearing from negotiators, the public clearly knows something is up in the bad way. >> i remain the most optimist
.5%. connell: a news alert from washington. you will see it here live from d.c. as we wait for the speaker, we will hear from a guy who says >> whatever god deal is signed, there will be a lot of pressure. boehner will have to cut a deal that raises taxes. their idea of fiscal conservatism, for two decades, has only been about taxes. meanwhile, under current sentiment, underneath him, why don't you finally go after spending. those tea party people will be completely hostile to whatever deal comes up. connell: the reason he is speaker of the house is because of those tea party. the same group that may, if you are right though i drive him out of town. >> he has been systematically pushing tea party people out of committees in order to get his conference more in line. connell: he better kind of followed the line here. >> that is how you organize and discipline. it will hurt the economy without solving the problem. connell: is he supposed to -- that would be characterized as a "grand bargain." if you are right, his job is literally on the line. >> there isn't much of an option. he has not been tal
well that in washington when you're talking about obligating a future congress to make cuts, that's not a deal. and that's the same hook that republicans have always gotten hung on in previous negotiations with democrats when rate increases are on the table. so republicans are saying, look, we'll go 37%. we may even talk about 39%, but we want to see real cuts that are right now, not something that you're going to obligate the congress of 2020 to do because that's not going to happen. >> but that's fine, michael, but that's not what they're saying. >> that is what they're saying. >> no, no, no. boehner wrote a letter in plain english, typed it out, no rate increases, period. not no rate increases -- >> come on. steve, like that means something? >> hold on. so he wrote that letter. the president said we're not going to move from 39%. the president -- >> no, he did not say that. >> let me finish. the president subsequently said we can meet them halfway, and boehner did not rule out a 37% number. >> no, he briefly didn't rule it out, and then he ruled it out. >> it's still on the tab
're thinking washington would not be so stupid as to let this fall through, go off the fiscal cliff. bottom line we expect the speaker to hammer away on too much spending. washington has a spending problem, a familiar theme in all these talks, jenna. jenna: we'll take the viewers back there when bain starts to speak. mike, thank you. >> reporter: thank you. jon: wouldn't it be nice if he could talk about some progress. joining us with more on this, kimberly strassel, a columnist for "the wall street journal" as michael lewded to, they have about what, 72 hours really to get something concrete done here? >> that's right. when you think about this, everyone talks about the january 1st deadline but reality is most people are looking at next friday as the real deadline. they're assuming that that is when the markets consider there to be a deadline. if something isn't done by then maybe panic ensues. so when you work back from that you have to leave at least a week for the republicans to put something up in the house, give those requisite three days for members to read it, for the public to see
as the "wall street journal" nbc poll. let's go to washington to the senior congressional correspondent. dana, you talked to the two men who spent their careers in congress making deals like this. how do they pull it off? >> it was a fascinating conversation. the two men you are talking are about two former senate majority leaders. a republican and a democrat. trent lott and tom daschle. they worked on opposite sides for almost a decade. that is the question i asked. it wasn't always pretty, but how did you come up with deals when you had touch negotiations like what's going on right now. the answer was simple. talk to each other. >> i do think that they reached a point where they need to quit talking through the media. i'm talking about both parties and the leaders in congress. some of the most effective wi timth theresint or at dn least with the chief of staff and the director with our key budget people and we really talk about alternatives and hammered it out. >> this will be the test. if we reset it has to happen around the fiscal cliff first. there a lot of other issues out there that co
are joining them. geez, i may faint. now to washington, d.c. with fed chairman ben bernanke sent a chill down the spine of traders on wall street. bernanke said the fed's money printing should last only until we hit 6.5% unemployment. markets didn't like that one bit and a good rally was completely erased. and we go to damascus where the assad regime is firing scud missiles and where did those missiles come from anyway? >>> in a letter to senate majority leader harry reid, 18 democratic senators are requesting a sweetheart deal to delay a 2.3% medical device tax that is part of obama care. due to start january 1st. but you know what, may i with all respect, these guys are hypocrites. they're not supply siders. yes, the tax is a job killer, as they say, but it's only hitting their states. the senators claim the medical device tax kills jobs but why aren't they against all the other job killing obama care taxes or for that matter the fiscal cliff tax hikes that are coming. let's faulk about this. we have igor volsky and guy benson. guy benson, i am glad they have won't up to this lousy medical
in benghazi a month before the attack where the individuals on the ground, head of security, warned washington they could not sustain a coordinated attack and there were at least ten militias or islamist groups. it amounts to a smoking gun warning. not the only was there further security provided but the security force was further pulled back. >> what are we learning about the status of that f.b.i. investigation? >> one of the things that is striking about the two classified briefings is a tight lid on response from lawmakers in the briefings about what we've learned. they were told there's been limited progress in the investigation by the f.b.i. because it's been hampered by a lack of cooperation by the countries who hold the suspects, particularly when you look at libya where the government does not have control over the eastern part of the country where benghazi is locate. the leading democrat is telling fox characterizing this lack of progress is limited. >> there's a lot more to do. this is an ondoing process but we're using our techniques and using our relationships with other government
for many american pedestrians. that was the finding of a university of washington study published in the journal "prevention." it tracked 1,100 pedestrians in seattle, washington and found more than a third of people text, talk or listen to music when they cross the street. only one in four people followed the proper safety protocol, looking both ways and obeying the light. vehicle-pedestrian accidents kill 4,000 people every year in the u.s. and injure 60,000 others. the man who co-invented the bar code joseph woodland has died in new jersey. woodland's bar codes are on nearly every product in stores today. he came up with the idea after drawing morse code dots and dashes in the sand on a miami beach, absent-mindedly letting his fingers drag a series of parallel lines instead. the idea was patented in 1952 but not put into wide use until the 1970s. woodland was 91 years old. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to margaret. >> warner: 18 days and counting until the end of the year when the government reaches the edge of the so-called fiscal cliff. congressional co
. and we can only hope, learned a lesson in the process. >>> and this one's for you, george. as washington man, the gridlock, at least congress doesn't look like this. take a look. nothing gets george like a good parliament stepto. members of the ukrainian parliament couldn't decide who they wanted their next chairman to be. so, of course, this is actually, perhaps, in the bylaws. you fight it out. >> usually, that's taiwan. >> it is more exciting than a thumb war. one guy, yes. it did look like he was trying to crowd surf. we've obviously seen chairs thrown. but not today. perhaps progress, if only incremental. >> boy. let's hope it doesn't come to that in washington. >>> we have a different story here, though. >> we have some chilling, new details about the gunman who went on a shooting spree at an oregon mall earlier this week. we are learning more about the shooter from his ex-girlfriend. abc's neal karlinsky is in portland, oregon, with the very latest on this. neal, good morning. >> reporter: amy, good morning. that's right. we now know a lot more about the shooter this morning. we k
, not his washington office, we're told. but let's start with that, chris. how exactly does that happen? >> well, megyn, one supposes that the screening for interns willing to toil for some elected official is not that strict. but -- maybe they're not going to do a background check for sex offender. but, you know, immigration status, you'd think there might have been something that could have happened there that they would have done the standard employment verification, but maybe they didn't because he was just an intern. but, gosh, this is a state of affairs that new jersey republicans would really have liked to have known about in october instead of december. megyn: yeah. and i -- the business, the guy was 18 years old, we're told. so the business about the sex offender registry, i don't know, to me there's a question mark on that because if you get that while you're under age, which is what we're told is what happened with this guy, it may not be accessible via public record. but if he had to register -- so i don't know. i don't know what the story is there. however, on the illegal i
in washington, d.c. with the republican majority in the house of representatives. it seems so unlikely to have occurred in michigan. jennifer granholm recently your two-term governor, a colleague here at current tv, and also a close friend, i said to her i can't understand how this has happened. would these bills pass in the new legislature that will be seated in january? >> that's a great question and we have to question that. what is the push? why are we pushing these true these through in lame duck. i think they would have a harder time and i think that's why they're pushing it through. you saw the outpour in june against the when i use the word vagina. people were outraged with this legislation. you know, from there we had the aiken comment, and it went on from there. and the outcry and how women came out in november to vote. >> eliot: right. >> everything that they're trying to be push through lame duck is against the voters. there was something else being introduced, a tax exemption for fetuses. and you know, and take into account that this term we already got rid of the tax deduction f
them. and if washington tries to cram decisions about the future... of these programs into a last minute budget deal... we'll all pay the price. aarp is fighting to protect seniors with responsible... solutions that strengthen medicare and... social security for generations to come. we can do better than a last minute deal... that would hurt all of us. >>> amid the partisan wrangling over the fiscal cliff there is agreement on capitol hill over one issue, human growth hormone testing for nfl players. the nfl players union has fought implementation of testing for steroids since it was included as last year's collective bargaining agreement. major league baseball already tests its players. lawmakers for the nfl to follow suit which included testimony from a football legend. >> believe me, i believe a lot of them wanted -- nobody wants to be playing and have that shadow hanging over. well did he or didn't he take the juice? did he or didn't he? the majority of them want to do the testing. >> we are addicted in our society. we have an addiction to winning, winning at all costs. we hav
but stalemate in washington continues, the white house demanding tax hikes on the top 2%. president obama lowered the amount from 1.6 to $1.4 trillion. that's not good enough for the republicans holding out for cuts to programs like social security. congressional leaders warn lawmakers not to make holiday travel plans. they will work to the last minute. >>> it's been a busy morning for all things business. >> certainly. he has plenty of new numbers from washington and some new maps from apple and this would be jason brooks with kcbs and cbsmoneywatch.com. good morning. >> good morning. >> reporter: and we have some decent news on the economy but that's largely being overshadowed by the "fiscal cliff" talks. a lot of worries on wall street if an agreement can't be reached by the end of the year. but as far as of the economy goes, decent news especially on the job market. the labor department reporting that first time unemployment claims fell by 29,000 to 343,000 the lowest level in two months and the second lowest level of the year. it suggests hiring is outpacing firing. the four-week ave
restaurants and nightlife and shopping and washington street was not flooded. many of our businesses have been impacted by the closure of the path, 60%. some businesses are reporting as much as 60% down in business. my main concern is the 200 or so businesses off of washington street who are struggling to either stay open, operating in an alternate location or potentially over the next several months could be forced to close down. that's my focus right now. >> i understand there was $1 hundred million in damage in hoboken. what is the main source of revenue for helping people get back to work and get back to business? >> well, for businesses the only option for them from the federal government is an sba loan, and that sba loan is either at 4% or ironic at better credit at 6%. in this economic climate when businesses have already taken loans, they just can't afford to take on so much more debt. i was advocating today for direct grants for the businesses, which is not currently available, for much lower loan rates. i mean, for an individual you can get a rate of 1.6%. can we do that for business
, or the republicans caving on the tax side. are you seeing that infighting in washington right now? >> well, infighting is probably a harsh word. if that is a definition we infight all the time around here. hopefully it is a healthy dialogue where everyone gets a chance to express themselves. .9 of representation in america for people to give their point of view. they feel they have been heard, even if they don't get their entire way. most people, are willing to comprise a little bit. that is what we have to have here, unfortunate tax increases to balance lance our budget and unfortunately entitlement reforms particularly on health care side so we don't have the debt as far as eye can see. hopefully the speaker and president will get there. the solution is pretty straightforward. sandra: it isn't straightforward because we have so much disagreement. maybe it is harsh to call it as infighting maybe tension. more than 100 conservative leaders including former presidential candidate rick santorum, saying gop congressman will be targeted if they make concession on tax hikes. that sound like ten
in your op-ed today, and i want to quote you directly. you said, in part, washington has become possessed by the idea that a small group of negotiators, meeting in secret, can solve the deep, painful, and systemic problems plaguing this country with a single grand bargain, produced at the 59th minute of the 11th hour. this is a siren song. i suppose the question would be then, what makes you think, senator, that a larger group of lawmakers, say congress, would be able to do any better, given the unbearable gridlock that you all have been in, and given the fact that gallup has polled you all at 10% favorability. what makes you think you can do better? >> ashleigh, i think, had we been debating for the last two years openly and honestly, the very difficult choices this country faces, the threat we have over us from the debt, the american, and we've done so intelligently and effectively, and our members are capable of that, i believe the american people would have a better -- >> but senator, i think there are a lot of people who disagree with you and say, open and wonderful debate, sure, but
for those of you watching at home. good day. i'm andrea mitchell live many washington. we're another step closer to the cliff, but still far from a deal. our nbc news-wall street journal poll shows that both sides of the aisle are going to catch a lot of heat if there isn't a compromise. joining me now for our daily fix, chris and managing editor post politics.com and nbc news senior political editor mark murray. thanks to both of where you. both of you have been writing about the poll, absorbing the poll, looking at all the details. first to you. what is your biggest take-away about the warning signs for a politician in both parties if they don't reach a deal? >> well, first of all, there is that number 56% in the nbc juz-wall street journal poll say they would blame both president obama and republicans if no deal is reached. if you look at the poll broadly, that is a little bit of good news for republicans only because most other data that i have seen suggests that the blame would fall more on republicans, so a lot of republicans pointed me to that number. one thing i would say if you l
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18

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